GENERAL

  1. In order to initiate coordination with another controller, inform the other ATC of the type of coordination that is about to take place after you state their position and your position. This is to allow that controller to appropriately place you in a priority que. The following are examples of the most common types of coordination:
    • APREQ “App Wreck”
    • Point-Out
    • Request
    • Position Assumption/Closing
    • Release Request
    • Information
      1. This is a blanket coordination type that generally doesn’t require any approvals or other information from the controller you are calling. I.e. “Rolling Call” or “Missed Approach” would be under the coordination title “Information”.
  2. When needing to interrupt another coordination that is taking place for a higher priority item such as a situation where separation may be lost or emergency, you may speak over the other coordination and start the coordination with one of the two following statements as appropriate:
    • “Break for Control…”
    • “Emergency…”
  3. When needing to reference an aircraft in coordination but visual acquisition of said aircraft is not required (Ex: CTR speaking to DEL about a specific flight strip that was just printed or CTR to CTR concerning changing an aircraft’s route while in the next CTR’s airspace), preface the Callsign and coordination information with the word “Reference”.
    Example:
    “Salt Lake Local, Stockton. Information.”
    “Reference DAL1234 has declared Low Fuel. ETA 25min.”
  4. When able, utilize text coordination for general coordination. When conducting text communication/coordination, facility callsigns are not required and the main coordination may be conducted immediately.

GROUND 2 GROUND COORDINATION FORMAT Part 1

  1. When text coordination is will not suffice, voice coordination will follow this following format:
  • Person initiating coordination: “(Facility name of person to be called), (facility name of person calling). (Type of coordination).
  • Person being called: “(facility name)
  • person initiating: “(message)
  • (negotiation of the coordination, if any)
  • person being called: “(controller initials)
  • person initiating: “(controller initials)

Example:

  • SLC_TWR to GUNNISON SECTOR: “Gunnison. Salt Lake Local. APREQ.”
  • GUNNISON SECTOR: “Gunnison.”
  • SLC_TWR: “Air-Gun71 APREQ unrestricted climb to 17,000.”
  • GUNNISON: “Air-Gun71 unable. Unrestricted up to 10,000 approved.”
  • SLC_TWR: “Unrestricted approved up to 10,000.”
  • GUNNISON: “KL”
  • SLC_TWR: “KF”

APPROVAL REQUEST (APREQ)APP WRECK

  1. An APREQ is a coordination request with the next sector or ATC that an aircraft will enter and requires approval for the specific operation. These operations can include but are not limited to: Non-Standard Operations, Deviations from Letters of Agreement, Non-RVSM aircraft in RVSM airspace, requesting a block of airspace, Inappropriate Altitude For Direction Of Flight (IAFDOF) “Eye Off Doff”, etc…
    Examples:
    • “APREQ, N928X climbing to 11,000”
    • “APREQ, UAL452 IAFDOF FL190 due to weather”
    • “APREQ, SWA8832 direct AKO VOR/DME”
    • “APREQ, N234BB Negative RVSM FL290”
    • “APREQ, Block 15,000 and below for an Austin departure to JWELL and then turning north eastbound”
  2. Appropriate responses to approving an APREQ:
    • (Callsign) Approved as requested
    • (Callsign) (repeated request) Approved.
  3. The appropriate responses to denying an APREQ:
    • (Callsign) Unable
    • (Callsign) Unable. (amended/compromised request) Approved.
      Example:
      SLC_TWR: “Air-Gun71 APREQ unrestricted climb to 17,000.”
    • GUNNISON: “Air-Gun71 unable. Unrestricted up to 10,000 approved.”

REQUEST

  1. A Request is a request made to the sector that has control of an aircraft prior to it entering your sector. These requests must be made sparingly and only when the action cannot be reasonably completed in your airspace.
    Examples:
    • “Request AAL1234 at FL200 for direction of flight and low altimeters”
    • “Request DAL8745 direct DTA VORTAC for traffic.”

POINT-OUT

  • Center:
    When possible, prior to beginning coordination concerning a RADAR target, utilize the Point-Out function (QP command in vERAM) to force a Full Datablock (FDB) onto the controller’s scope.
  • TRACON/RADAR Tower:
    Seeing how in STARS, the “Full datablock” is always shown when another controller within the same facility is tracking that target, the vSTARS command *<slew> for “Point Out” does not force a full datablock onto the other controllers scope like but is suggested to be used prior to starting the coordination to simulate real world automated point-out procedures and situation awareness.
  • Only utilize the point-out command (automated Point-Outs) or assume the other facility is able to see the callsign of the tracked target between facilities that use the same RADAR system as in the real world. For example, if an ERAM (Center) facility sends an automated Point-Out to a facility that does not use ERAM, such as TRACONs/Towers or other country’s Centers, the other facility will not receive it, and vice versa. In order to simulate this real world limitation, assume the following facilities to be using the same RADAR Display Systems in the following table:
POSITIONREAL WORLD RADAR SYSTEM USED
TRACON (APP)
RADAR LOCAL (TWR)
STARS
US ARTCC (CTR)ERAM
NON-RADAR LOCAL (TWR)NONE
Non-US FIR (CTR),
TRACON (APP), or Local (TWR)
Not STARS or ERAM
  • When approving a point-out, the appropriate format for the response is:
    “(Callsign or Beacon Code) Point-Out Approved”
  • When initiating a point-out with a controller, that controller may have traffic that would possibly be a conflict with your desired point-out. That controller may either convert the point-out to a handoff by replying “(Callsign) RADAR Contact” or they might “reference” traffic to you. In the case of the latter, it is your responsibility to determine if you are able to maintain separation from that traffic during the operation or not. If you are able to maintain the separation yourself, you will reply with “Traffic Observed”, then the controller will approve the point-out.
    Example:
    • BEAR: “Gunnison, Bear, Point-Out.”
    • GUNNISON: “Gunnison”
    • BEAR: “Southeast BEARR intersection, AAL123. FL190. Direct Fairfield VORTAC”
    • GUNNISON: “Reference Traffic Northwest Salt Lake Airport, DAL745. 17,300 Climbing FL200. Northwest-bound.”
    • BEAR: “DAL745 traffic observed”
    • GUNNISON: “AAL123 point-out approved, KF”
    • BEAR: “KC”


Note-The previous example was for a STARS facility, so for an ERAM facility the only thing that would change is that prior to initiating the Point-Out or Reference of traffic, the initiating controller would force the FDB onto the other controllers scope.

HANDOFF

  • When accepting a manual handoff of an aircraft, the appropriate format for the response is:
    “(Callsign or Beacon Code) RADAR Contact”

GROUND 2 GROUND COORDINATION FORMAT Part 2

  • Utilize the acronym T.W.W.A.D (“Tee-Wod”) to assist in appropriate coordination formats.
    Note-Some of the following items are not always needed, depending on the situation and type of coordination.

T – Type of coordination

W – Where to Look

W – Who to look for

A – Altitude information

D – Direction of flight/route

  • TYPE OF COORDINATION:
    1. Example:
      “Stockton, Gunnison. Handoff.
    2. Once the controller answers your request to start coordinating, follow through with the following items.
  • WHERE TO LOOK:
    1. State the distance and direction of the reference target from a NAVAID/Fix that is shown on both ATC RADAR displays.
      Example:
      “8 miles northeast OGD VORTAC, etc…”
    2. The Distance may be omitted if utilizing the Point-Out/Full Datablock function.
      Example:
      “northeast OGD VORTAC, etc…”
  • WHO TO LOOK FOR:
    1. State the type of target to look for, as appropriate (Primary Target, Beacon Code and/or Callsign). If you and the controller are both simulating use of ERAM and the aircrafts’ route will take them within approx 60 miles of your border, you may state the Callsign only.
      Examples:
      “Primary Target, etc…”
      “Primary Target is AAL7564, etc…”
      “Beacon 1235, etc…”
      “Beacon 1235 is AAL7564, etc…”
      “AAL7564, etc…”
    2. When referencing the target to a facility that does not use the same RADAR System as yours, you must reference the beacon code.
      Examples:
      “Beacon 1235, etc…”
  • ALTITUDE INFORMATION:
    1. State the current verified MODE-C altitude response.
      Note-This may be omitted if the other controller is the same facility as you, as the altitude information is being gathered from the same source.
      Example:
      One-Zero thousand, six hundred.
    2. If the aircraft is not level at an altitude, inform the other ATC of the aircraft’s climbing/descending status and the assigned altitude.
      Examples:
      “Climbing one-two thousand”
      “One-zero thousand, six hundred. Climbing one-two thousand
      “One-zero thousand, six hundred. Climbing via SID
    3. For Point-outs, the altitude(s) in which the pilot will be operating within the ATC’s airspace is required to be stated.
      Examples:
      “One-zero thousand, six hundred. Climbing 11,000
      “One-zero thousand, six hundred. Climbing/Descending above/below your airspace
  • DIRECTION OF FLIGHT/ROUTE:
    1. If appropriate (usually during point-outs), state the appropriate flight path information that affects their sector.
    2. During handoff coordination, state the next fix that the aircraft is to progress.
      Note-This may be omitted if the aircraft is on a route that is defined by LOA or is clearly shown in their flight strip.
      Example:
      “Direct Milford VOR DME”
      “On Delta Arrival.”
    3. During point-out coordination, inform the other ATC of the current route, next fix, and/or cardinal direction.
      Example:
      “J58 to Milford VOR DME”
      “Direct Milford VOR DME”
      “Eastbound”
  • EXAMPLES
    1. HANDOFF
      1. ARTCC to ARTCC (Interfacility)
        1. “Handoff, 11 miles southwest Milford VORTAC. AAL123. FL320.”
        2. “Handoff, 11 miles southwest Milford VORTAC. AAL123. FL326 climbing FL340.”
      2. ARTCC to ARTCC (intrafacility)
        1. “Handoff, 11 miles southwest Milford VORTAC. AAL123.”
        2. “Handoff, 11 miles southwest Milford VORTAC. AAL123. Climbing FL340.”
      3. ARTCC to TRACON
        1. “Handoff, 11 miles south FRNZY. Beacon 1324 is AAL123. FL193. Descending 17,000.”
        2. “Handoff, 11 miles south FRNZY. Beacon 1324 is AAL123. FL193. Descending 17,000. Direct FRNZY.”
      4. TRACON to ARTCC
        1. “Handoff, 8 miles northeast Ogden VORTAC. Beacon 1324 is AAL123. FL193. Climbing FL230.”
        2. “Handoff, 8 miles northeast Ogden VORTAC. Beacon 1324 is AAL123. FL193. Climbing FL230. Direct UPJAR.”
      5. TRACON to TRACON (intrafacility) (or airport using the same RADAR Feed as the TRACON)
        1. “Handoff, northwest Ogden VORTAC. AAL123.”
        2. “Handoff, northwest Ogden VORTAC. AAL123. Descending 11,000.”
        3. “Handoff, northwest Ogden VORTAC. AAL123. Descending 11,000. Direct BUBBY”
    2. POINT-OUT
      1. ARTCC to ARTCC (Interfacility)
        1. *Force AAL123 FDB*
          “Point-Out, southwest Milford VORTAC. AAL123. FL320. Southbound”
        2. *Force AAL123 FDB*
          “Point-Out, 11 miles southwest Milford VORTAC. AAL123. FL326 climbing FL340. Southbound.”
      2. ARTCC to ARTCC (intrafacility)
        1. *Force AAL123 FDB*
          “Point-Out, southwest Milford VORTAC. AAL123. Southbound”
        2. *Force AAL123 FDB*
          “Point-Out, 11 miles southwest Milford VORTAC. AAL123. Climbing FL340. Southbound.”
      3. ARTCC to TRACON
        1. “Point-Out, 6 miles southwest FRNZY intersection. Beacon 1324. FL210. westbound”
        2. “Point-Out, 6 miles southwest FRNZY intersection. Beacon 1324. FL213. Climbing FL230. Direct Myton VOR/DME.”
        3. “Point-Out, 6 miles southwest FRNZY intersection. Beacon 1324. FL213. Climbing FL230. North eastbound until the border and then turning more eastbound.”
      4. TRACON to ARTCC
        1. “Point-Out, 6 miles southeast Fairfield VORTAC. Beacon 1345. 16,000. Southeast-Bound to the boundary and then reversing course.”
        2. “Point-Out, 6 miles southeast Fairfield VORTAC. Beacon 1345. 16,200. Block 15,000 through 17,000. Southeast-Bound to the boundary and then reversing course.”
      5. TRACON to TRACON (intrafacility) (or airport using the same RADAR Feed as the TRACON)
        1. “Point-Out, northwest Fairfield VORTAC. N823AA. 10,000. Southeast-bound”
        2. “Point-Out, northwest Fairfield VORTAC. N823AA. 13,000. Descending 9,000. Direct Fairfield VORTAC.”

RELEASE REQUEST

By default, all Local (TWR) controllers must request a “Release” of an IFR departure (local SOPs/LOAs may illustrate situations where this is not required). A standard Release Request call will happen like so:

  • TWR: “(departure position), (your position). Release Request”
  • DEP: *answers with their position name*
  • TWR: “Request Release (aircraft full callsign) to (aircraft’s destination airport). (anything else that your local SOPs/LOAs require)”
  • DEP: “(aircraft full callsign) released. (operator initials)”
  • TWR: “(operator initials)”

Example:

  • TWR: “Lake, Ogden Local. Release Request”
  • DEP: “Lake”
  • TWR: “Request Release N123AB to Wendover Airport.”
  • DEP: “N123AB released. NB”
  • TWR: “JP”

ROLLING CALLS

In order to assist in the RADAR Identification of IFR aircraft departing a field that does not have an automated system in place (7110.65 5-3-2), Local Control (TWR) must issue a “Rolling Call”. This call is verbal by default but your SOPs/LOAs may allow text notifications. This call must be issued after the aircraft is witnessed starting their takeoff roll and prior to 1 mile of the takeoff runway end. Local Directives will illustrate when rolling calls are not required. A rolling call should follow a format as so:

  • TWR: “(departure position), (your position). Information.”
  • DEP: *answers with their position name*
  • TWR: “(aircraft full callsign) Rolling.”
  • DEP: “(operator initials)”
  • TWR: “(operator initials)”

Example:

  • TWR: “Lake, Ogden Local. Information”
  • DEP: “Lake”
  • TWR: “N123AB Rolling.”
  • DEP: “NB”
  • TWR: “JP”

The previous template is the FORMAL way to conduct the Rolling Call; the less formal and more popular method is the “Lazy Shout-Line” format where the initiating controller does not wait for the response from the receiving controller before giving the information needed. This type of coordination is highly discouraged with any other type of coordination but is usually acceptable for Rolling Calls due to the small amount of information actually being transmitted and is usually expected by the receiving controller.

  • TWR: “(departure position), (your position). (aircraft full callsign) Rolling.”
  • DEP: “(operator initials)”
  • TWR: “(operator initials)”

Example:

  • TWR: “Lake, Ogden Local. N123AB Rolling”
  • DEP: “NB”
  • TWR: “JP”